Proceedings Magazine - May 1943 Vol. 69/5/483

Cover Story

“I light my candle from their torches.” . . . Robert Burton.

 

When the twelfth century was nearing its end, a kurultai in the city of Karakorum came...

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Highlights

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  • Followship (Honorable Mention, 1943)
    By Captain G. V. Stewart, U. S. Navy (Retired)

    “I light my candle from their torches.” . . . Robert Burton.

     

    When the twelfth century was nearing its end, a kurultai in the city of Karakorum came to its conclusion and only the formal charging of...

  • Wind Rules Again
    By Lieutenant Commander William C. Chambliss, U. S. Naval Reserve

    When the late Robert Fulton successfully harnessed steam to the job of propelling ships through the water, it was generally assumed that mariners were freed from the tyranny of fickle wind. Of course, storms still held peril. But in the ordinary...

  • Japanese Espionage and Our Psychology for Failure
    By Fred Henry

    THERE IS A far greater reason for the calamity at Pearl Harbor than merely unawareness. A greater basic reason exists for the Japanese successes in the Dutch East Indies than merely the Possession of a superior striking force. That basic reason,...

  • The Second Battle of Manila Bay
    By Lieutenant Commander T. W. Davison, U. S. Navy

    This war has brought out two uses of the word “battle.” One has broad implications of time and space, as the Battle of the Atlantic, or the Battle of Russia. The other is limited in time and space, as the Battle of the Coral Sea....

  • Wanted: A New Naval Development Policy
    By Lieutenant Franklin G. Percival, U. S. Navy (Retired)

    “What is the problem?”—Foch

     

  • Macassar Merry-Go-Round
    By Lieutenant William P. Mack, U. S. Navy

    I felt as though we had jumped on a merry-go-round, grabbed a handful of brass rings, and then had jumped off without paying for our ride. It was hard to believe that four rickety, rusty old 1917 four-pipers could do such things.

  • An American Way of Peace or War
    By Charles A. Weil

    La Politique Des Etats Est Dans Leur Geographie.”Napoleon

     

    There have been so far few practical suggestions made as to the way in which the peace for which...

  • The Aero-Amphibious Phase of the Present War
    By Captain Logan C. Ramsey, U. S. Navy

    THE PRIMITIVE form of warfare had a very simple pattern; readily comprehended in its entirety, by even the limited understanding of prehistoric man. When another human made a hostile gesture, one merely grabbed a club and rushed at him, with the...

  • Labor Relations and the Navy
    By Lieutenant John J. Collins, U. S. Naval Reserve

    “E Pluribus Unum”

     

  • Discussions, Comments and Notes

    A Proposed Method of Selecting Candidates for the Naval Academy

    (See page 1679, December, 1942, Proceedings)

  • Book Reviews

    AMERICA AT WAR.

    By Samuel Van Valkenburg (editor), Ellsworth Huntington, W. W. Atwood, Jr., W. Elmer Ekblaw, Clarence F. Jones, and Earl B. Shaw.

    New York: Prentice-Hall, Inc. 1942. 284...

  • Notes on International Affairs

    AMERICA AND THE WAR

  • Professional Notes
  • Photographs

 
 

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