U.S. NAVY

Honoring Tradition

By Master Chief Electronics Technician (Surface Warfare) John Hagan, USN
December 1997
There is a distinct difference between looking backward and not forgetting.

Comment and Discussion

December 1997
"Not Your Grandpa's 'Gator But It May Be Your Granddaughter's" (See M. A. Gauthier and C. Clavier, pp. 61-64, October 1997 Proceedings) Major Reid E. Smith III, U.S. Army Reserve-This ...
U.S. COAST GUARD

Semper Paratus in the 21st Century

By Lieutenant Commander Carl B. Frank, U.S. Coast Guard
December 1997
Business as usual will mean going out of business. Will vessels like the one shown in this notional depiction of a multimission cutter from Coast Guard files be in the ...
U.S. COAST GUARD

Lessons Learned From the Marijuana War

By Captain Raymond J. Brown, U.S. Coast Guard
December 1997
After ten years of concerted effort, by 1990 the U.S. Coast Guard virtually had shut down the trade of marijuana by sea. We did many things right. We could have ...
DENNIS O. HALL

The Hardest Job in the Coast Guard

By Yeoman First Class Mark J. McCracken, U.S. Coast Guard
December 1997
In the dark of the night at four different Coast Guard units in four parts of the country, four very different active-duty Coast Guard personnel are sitting alone, taking a ...
U.S. COAST GUARD

Steaming with the Russians

By Admiral Robert E. Kramek, with Commander W. Russell Webster, U.S. Coast Guard
December 1997
U.S. Coast Guard operations with the Russian Federal Border Service are expanding-from familiarization and relationship building to multiservice exercises.
MARCONI UNDERWATER SYSTEMS

Restoring Impunity to the "Targets"

By Lieutenant George S. Capen, U.S. Navy
December 1997
From the simple floating mines that sank the USS Cairo in the Civil War to today's modern weapons, torpedoes have been the bane of surface warriors. It is time to ...
AP/WIDEWORLD PHOTOS

Just Cause for Intervention

By Lieutenant Commander Glenn T. Ware, U.S. Navy
December 1997
Expanding the basis for U.S. international intervention will mean earlier engagement in humanitarian emergencies. In Rwanda this could have saved thousands of lives.
COMBAT CAMERA (MARV LYNCHARD)

Support & Stability Triage

By Lieutenant Colonel George E Rector Jr., U.S. Marine Corps
December 1997
Operations such as peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance can serve U.S. interests, but guidelines for participation must be established to keep them from effecting primary missions and readiness.
ILLUSTRATION BY ERIC SMITH

Looking for Another Rickover

By Jim Pietrocini
December 1997
As it enters a new age of information technology, the Navy must have a strong, committed information czar—a modern Admiral Hyman Rickover.
COURTESY OF AVONDALE

Reinventing Sealift

By Lieutenant Commander Sean T. Connaughton, U.S. Naval Reserve
December 1997
Unless action is taken, there will not be enough personnel or ships available to satisfy U.S. military sealift needs in the next national emergency.
COURTESY OF THE AUTHOR

Seven Seconds to Infamy

By John F. De Virgilio
December 1997
The most enduring symbol of the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor is the battleship Arizona (BB-39), where 1,177 U.S. Navy men lost their lives. Details of her final moments and ...
U.S. NAVY

Fortunate Blunder

By Captain R.C. Gillette, U.S. Navy (Retired)
December 1997
Did the Lexington spot a Japanese aircraft en route to Pearl Harbor?
COURTESY OF THE AUTHOR

Professional Notes

December 1997
It's Time to Train for War By Lieutenant Colonel Thomas D. Morgan, U.S. Army (Retired) War games always have been a serious matter for the military; their history as training ...
NATIONAL ARCHIVES

Everyone's USO

By David Millman
December 1997
For most, the USO is forever caught in the images of celebrities such as Bob Hope and Marilyn Monroe entertaining the troops in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. But ...
U.S. NAVY

Book Reviews

December 1997
Black Shoes and Blue Water: Surface Warfare in the United States Navy, 1945-1975 Malcolm Muir Jr., Washington, D.C.: Naval Historical Center, 1996. 235 pp. Bib. Ind. Notes. Photos. $19.00. Order ...

Nobody Asked Me But…Naval Officers Need "Joint Legs"

By Lieutenant Colonel Robert B Adolph Jr., U.S. Army (Retired)
December 1997
Joint staff legs, unlike sea legs, don't appear to come easily to some naval officers. Naval officers seem to take longer to integrate into joint staff assignments than their multiservice ...
SEAMAGINE

Oceans: A Submarine in Every Garage?

By Don Walsh
December 1997
More than 250 manned submersibles have been built worldwide since the late 1950s. They have ranged from the U.S. Navy's Bathyscaph Trieste of 1958 to modern 48-passenger tourist submarines, which ...

Points of Interest: TRICARE's Fatal Flaw?

By Tom Philpott
December 1997
More than 6,300 military health care beneficiaries in Colorado Springs, Colorado, learned in September that their primary care provider, Physicians Network, decided to withdraw from TRICARE Prime, just six months ...

World Naval Developments

By Norman Friedman
December 1997
Danes Plan Fleet Modernization The Royal Danish Navy is considering replacing its current Nils Juels-class frigates, Falster-class minelayers, and small Willemoes-class fast attack craft with six "Large Standard Vessels," each ...
A.D. BAKER III, AFTER A.S. PAVLOV

Combat Fleets

By A.D. Baker III, Editor, Combat Fleets of the World
December 1997
Russian television showed the laying of the first modular section for the new frigate Novik at Yantar Shipyard, Kaliningrad, on 26 July. Believed to be of the Project 1244.1 design ...

Lest We Forget

By Eric Wertheim
December 1997
Named for Lieutenant Paul Riley, a naval aviator who died during the Battle of Midway, the USS Riley (DE-579) was a Rudderow- classdestroyer built by Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard in Hingham, Massachusetts. ...

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