Contributors

September 2013
Lieutenant Commander Benjamin Armstrong, U.S. Navy, is a naval aviator currently serving in the Pentagon. He is a research student in War Studies with King’s College, London, and the ...
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia

On Our Scope

September 2013
Finding inspiration to work on Naval History is always easy. And sometimes outside events conspire to add extra enjoyment to the production of an issue of the magazine. That’s the ...
Paul Stillwell

Looking Back - One from the Bucket List

By Paul Stillwell
September 2013
Several years ago, Morgan Freeman and Jack Nicholson starred in a delightfully entertaining movie called The Bucket List, whose premise was that each man had a list of activities ...

In Contact

September 2013
Gone but not ForgottenCharles H. Dunlap, U.S. Navy (Retired)Norman Friedman’s article about the 5-inch/38-caliber gun in the April issue (“Armaments & Innovations,” pp. 10–11) brought back many memories. ...
New York Historical Society (W.H. Bartlett)

Armaments and Innovations - The Navy Toys With Telegraphy

By Commander Tyrone G. Martin, U. S. Navy (Retired)
September 2013
In 1793 France began building a revolutionary line-of-sight telegraph communications system—one that would employ visual signals, placed on a line of stations positioned every few miles so that brief messages ...
U.S. Naval Institute Photo Archive

Naval History News

September 2013
Captain James E. Wise Jr., 1930–2013Prolific Naval Institute Press author Captain James E. Wise Jr. (U.S. Navy, Retired), passed away in July. He was 82.A longtime friend of the Institute ...
J.M. Caiella

Historic Aircraft - The Pioneering Pioneer

By Norman Polmar
September 2013
The Navy has led the use of unmanned aircraft—drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)—among the U.S. military services. In the World War I era, the service experimented with radio-controlled aircraft ...
Niagara Historical Society and Museum

The War's Most Challenging Theater

By Charles E. Brodine Jr.
September 2013
The War of 1812 was fought on multiple fronts, but the northern lakes formed the strategically vital fault line between the United States and British Canada.
U.S. Naval Academy Museum (Gilbert Stuart)

The Cautious Commodore?

By Charles E. Brodine Jr.
September 2013
Because American forces failed to eradicate the British threat on Lake Ontario, Isaac Chauncey was fated to become a War of 1812 scapegoat.
Toronto Public Library

Daring Moves on the Niagara

By Lieutenant Commander Benjamin Armstrong, U.S. Navy
September 2013
Cutting-out expeditions and other irregular naval operations were a key component of the back-and-forth combat on the northern front.
National Archives

Charting a Course toward Rescue

By Lieutenant Colonel Tom C. McKenney, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
September 2013
World War II was over, but the U.S. Navy’s work wouldn’t be done until American and British POWs were liberated from their Formosa hellholes.

Book Reviews

September 2013
At Belleau Wood with Rifle and Sketchpad: Memoir of a United States Marine in World War ILouis C. Linn; Laura Jane Linn Wright, and B. J. Omanson, Eds. Jefferson, ...
Charles E. Brodine Jr.

Pieces of the Past

September 2013
On 16 November 1815, a four-man committee came aboard the frigate Java, laid up for repairs in New York Harbor, to present her commanding officer, Lieutenant Thomas Holdup, with an ...