Merrill L. Bartlett served as an officer in the Marine Corps for twenty years, with final assignment at the U.S. Naval Academy, where he earned three awards for excellence in teaching history. He is the author, coauthor, editor, or coeditor of seven books on naval history, and he has published more than a hundred essays, encyclopedia entries, forewords to books, and book reviews.

Articles by Merrill L. Bartlett

naval history and heritage command

Gunner Hulbert: 'A Real Old Corps Marine'

By Lieutenant Colonel Merrill L. Bartlett, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
November 2009
For valor against native Samoans in 1899 he received the Medal of Honor. But Henry Lewis Hulbert's ultimate test came at Blanc Mont in World War I.
Far left: Fix Bayonets!, John W. Thomason Jr.; Left: Courtesy of the author

The Marines' Most Bizarre Hero?

By Lieutenant Colonel Merrill L. Bartlett, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
April 2009
Louie Cukela, who left the Corps a legacy of courage on the battlefield, is legendary for his outrageous stunts and mangled diction.
navy art collection

A Fight to the Finish

By Lieutenant Colonel Merrill L. Bartlett, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
November 2008
Leathernecks and Doughboys were fighting and dying together 90 years ago up to the final hours of World War I.
u.s. marine corps combat art collection

Guadalcanal: A Real Hot Potato

By Lieutenant Colonel Merrill L. Bartlett, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
November 2007
Marines in the first great land battle of World War II issued an irreverent jab at Navy commanders. But did they deserve it?
Portrait of “Johnny the Hard” Hughes inset over a painting of the Battle of Belleau Wood

The Spirited Saga of ‘Johnny the Hard’

By Lieutenant Colonel Merrill L. Bartlett, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
June 2007
A legendary officer in the early 20th-century Marine Corps, John A. Hughes was feared for his mercurial temper but respected for his dauntless courage.
ERIC SMITH

Two Admirals for an Ensign

By Lieutenant Colonel Merrill L. Bartlett, U.S. Marine Corps (Retired)
February 1998
The Navy Department's failure to ease the glut of post-Civil War officers and new officer candidates in the 1880s prompted congressional intervention. A decade passed before the Navy could restore ...