JAPANESE DESTROYER CAPTAIN

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JAPANESE DESTROYER CAPTAIN
Pearl Harbor, Guadalcanal, Midway - The Great Naval Battles as Seen Through Japanese Eyes
  • ISBN/SKU: 9781591143840
  • Binding: Paperback & eBook
  • Era: 20th Century
  • Number of Pages: 336
  • Subject: World War II
  • Date Available: August 2011
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Full Description:

This highly regarded war memoir was a best seller in both Japan and the United States during the 1960s and has long been treasured by historians for its insights into the Japanese side of the surface war in the Pacific. The author was a survivor of more than one hundred sorties against the Allies and was known throughout Japan as the "Unsinkable Captain." A hero to his countrymen, Capt. Hara exemplified the best in Japanese surface commanders: highly skilled (he wrote the manual on torpedo warfare), hard driving, and aggressive. Moreover, he maintained a code of honor worthy of his samurai grandfather, and, as readers of this book have come to appreciate, he was as free with praise for American courage and resourcefulness as he was critical of himself and his senior commanders.

Capt. Tameichi Hara was a destroyer squadron commander for most of the war aboard Shigure. Fred Saito translated and expanded the original manuscript, after spending more than eight hundred hours interviewing Hara. Roger Pineau added the footnotes and checked the accuracy of the battle accounts.

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Average Customer Reviews
5.00 Stars
Japanese Destroyer Captain
Wednesday, October 5, 2011
By: Gregory Frick

This is a rousing tale of fear overcome and "togetherness" within a Navy. I wish I had read it in the '60s when I might have contacted Captain Hara. Hara's book is the best first hand account of anything I have yet read.

 
The Last Samurai.
Tuesday, November 27, 2012
By: Dr. James Hercules Sutton
Hara is the last samurai. He objected to compulsory suicide as official doctrine, because he saw this as a violation of bushido values. He turned pacifist BEFORE the Bomb. His personal doctrines demonstrate why the Japanese lost the war--they were inflexible. Hara wasn't. His doctrines were "Never ever do the same thing twice" and "If he hits you high, then hit him low; if he hits you low, then hit him high," the latter a maxim of MacArthur's, too. Hara criticizes his superiors for using cavalry tactics to fight naval battles; never understanding the implications of air power; dividing their forces in the face of enemy forces of unknown strength; basing tactics on what they thought their enemy would do; and accepting a war of attrition with a foe more capable of maintaining it. His technical discussions are superb. What gives the book significance is his explication of strategy/tactics and their implications. Hara is a brave man who knew WHY he did what he did. This puts him in a minority, in any navy.
 

 
 

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