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Raymond Cornelius Malley - - Pacific Theater Chief Petty Officer, U.S. Navy. On a warm, muggy and rainy day in July 2012, the Malley Family had a reunion at the Montgomery, New York, Firehouse with about 55 family and friends in attendance. It seems the younger generation of Malleys has an interest in the family trees associated with the Malley family, with some bringing information from many sources. One of the treasures that came to light was a box of letters written by Ray Malley and his brother Art Malley during their times in the Navy and Army. The letters from Ray Malley started in July 1930 from the USS Chaumont to March 1943 from the USS Trever. The collection was discovered in a closet in the Malley farmhouse, and while it is most likely not a complete compilation of his letters they paint a vivid picture of his life in the U.S. Navy with some insights to the impact of the Great Depression on the Malley farm. Perhaps the most important letter is the one he wrote on 13 December 1941, telling his mother he survived the attack on Pearl Harbor and probably wouldn’t make it home for Christmas. A chronological arrangement of Ray Malley’s letters, most of which were retyped for clarity (no attempt was made to correct spelling errors and when the writing was not legible either x’s or question marks were inserted), from the time of his enlistment to 1943 are included here. Numerous photos also were in the box (but most had no captions), and some have been inserted in the most logical places with the letters.
Henry H. Mauz - 1990-1991 - Persian Gulf Vice Admiral, U.S. Navy In 1991, the Roland Company collaborated with the U.S. Naval Institute in producing the documentary film “Storm From the Sea,” which featured extensive interviews with many of the key players in Operation Desert Storm. It was the first truly inside, in-depth look at that still-recent war to be presented to general audiences. Only a minor portion of the stories told by these men was used in the completed film, leaving unused a trove of valuable material for historians and others interested in the Gulf War. The transcripts of these interviews provide a moment-in-time personal snapshot of a consequential military event—when all the memories were very recent and very fresh. The Roland Company has graciously donated these unedited and unfiltered firsthand accounts to the U.S. Naval Institute Memoir Collection. They are presented here to the public for the first time. In this interview, Vice Admiral Henry H. Mauz Jr., who was serving as commander of the U.S. 7th Fleet when he was assigned command of all U.S. naval forces in the Persian Gulf, recounts his Desert Shield/Desert Storm experiences.
John J. McDonough - 1967-1975 - West Coast Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy Reserve
Knefler McGinnis - 1941 - Pacific Captain, U.S. Navy An eventful career spanning the early years of naval aviation comes to life in this reminiscence by Captain Knefler McGinnis. In January 1934, as a lieutenant commander, he led six Consolidated P2Y-1s on a nonstop flight from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor in a time of 24 hours, 35 minutes, thereby exceeding the distance record for mass flights and bettering the best previous time for the crossing. Other highlights of his story include having a certain Marc A. Mitscher as a co-pilot, and vivid memories of the events of 7 December 1941. McGinnis’ account is from a never-before-published series of interviews with early naval aviators conducted by the U.S. Naval Institute in the 1960s and 1970s, capturing these irreplaceable memories while these men were still alive. McGinnis spoke with U.S. Naval Institute interviewer Commander Etta-Belle Kitchen, USN (Ret.), in Pensacola, Florida, on 23 January 1971.
Donald C. McKinlay - 1945 - Pacific Theater Ensign, Pacific Fleet Donald McKinlay was sworn in as an ensign in the U.S. Navy in the wake of Pearl Harbor. The "Preamble" to his memoir covers his early naval experiences in the first year of U.S. involvement in World War II, then proceeds to "Invasion of Iwo Jima," his daily log of the climactic months of the Pacific War from February to July 1945, at which time he was gunnery officer on board the Buckley-class destroyer escort USS Barr (DE-576).
Samuel Eliot Morison - World War II years - Pacific Theater Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy Reserve Samuel Eliot Morison, the dean of American maritime and naval history, is most renowned and revered for his epic 15-volume magnum opus “History of United States Naval Operations in World War II.” He wrote several other massively popular and influential books as well during his long and distinguished career. Granted a remarkable degree of access among the U.S. Fleet during World War II, Morison was an eyewitness to the greatest naval conflict ever fought. This interview from the U.S. Naval Institute archives was conducted by James T. Westwood at Morison’s beloved home at Desert Island, Maine, on 27 October 1973. The 86-year-old Morison’s reminiscences here about his naval experiences feature insights about the great U.S. Navy admirals who steered the course of the Pacific War. Morison also displays an impressive grasp of the world situation at the time of the interview, offering his views on everything from the American experience in Vietnam to the rising power of the Soviet Navy.
Albert J. Pelletier Jr. - 1932 - Captain, COMINT Captain Albert Joseph Pelletier Jr. (1914-1999) served in the U.S. Navy from 1932 to 1968 and is most well remembered for his cryptography work during World War II and postwar communications intelligence (COMINT) activities. In the book "U.S. Navy Codebreakers," author Steven E. Maffeo describes Pelletier thusly: “Capt. Al Pelletier was a consummate COMINT pioneer and contributor. Even beyond that, he made indelible impressions upon many of his colleagues and students—such as ‘he was a hell of a guy, one you’re glad to got to meet, and one you’ll never forget,’ and ‘his laugh was infectious, and even in his later years his voice and laugh were his signature.’” In this reminiscence, which the late Captain Pelletier gave to the U.S. Naval Institute in 1994, he offers a vivid and lively description of his early years in the service. It provides an interesting look at life in the 1930s Navy.
Richard Reass - 1991 - Persian Gulf Captain, U.S. Navy In 1991, the Roland Company collaborated with the U.S. Naval Institute in producing the documentary film "Storm From the Sea," which featured extensive interviews with many of the key players in Operation Desert Storm. It was the first truly inside, in-depth look at that still-recent war to be presented to general audiences. Only a minor portion of the stories told by these men was used in the completed film, leaving unused a trove of valuable material for historians and others interested in the Gulf War. The transcripts of these interviews provide a moment-in-time personal snapshot of a consequential military event—when all the memories were very recent and very fresh. The Roland Company has graciously donated these unedited and unfiltered firsthand accounts to the U.S. Naval Institute Memoir Collection. They are presented here for the first time to the public. In this interview, Captain Richard Reass provides perspective from the vantage of the USS John F. Kennedy (CV-67) battle group.
Harold H. Sacks - 1952 - 1972 - Pacific Commander, U.S. Navy Commander Sacks' memoir covers the breadth of his 20-year naval career, beginning with his experiences at Officer Candidate School in 1952, through the Korean War, the Vietnam War, to his retirement in 1972.
Ralph M. Servadio - 1943 - South America Petty Officer First Class, U.S. Coast Guard Radioman First Class (RM1) Ralph M. Servadio served as a radio operator during World War II in a covert Coast Guard operation to intercept clandestine Nazi radio messages in South America. His memoir describes his path from boot camp to his amazing service at a remote radio monitoring station at Quientero, Chile. Servadio was born in Herkimer, New York in 1925, one of five sons of proud Italian immigrants. Ralph and his older brother Dominic enlisted in the Coast Guard in 1943. Both became radiomen. However, Dominic served aboard the cutter USS Taney; while Ralph served south of the equator to support the Coast Guard’s intelligence operations. Dominic earned four battle stars aboard Taney, while Ralph was awarded a Distinguished Service Medal for his duties in Chile.

 
 

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22 September - Annual Symposium

Sat, 2018-09-22

22 September - Annual Symposium

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John B. Lundstrom

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