Proceedings Magazine - July 1944 Vol. 70/7/497

Cover Story
Post-war defense for America is an im­portant war-time subject, one no doubt receiving full attention in the War and Navy Departments, and perhaps even in some of the civilian branches. The...
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Highlights

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  • Our Future Military Strength
    By Lieutenant Riley Sunderland, F.A., U. S. Army
    Post-war defense for America is an im­portant war-time subject, one no doubt receiving full attention in the War and Navy Departments, and perhaps even in some of the civilian branches. The size of our post-war armed forces, as reflected in...
  • The "Tireless Tee" Goes Forth to War
    By Commander D. M. Agnew, U. S. Navy

    We Leave Pearl

    Our squadron mates called us the “Terrible Tee”; we didn’t mind too much, but we preferred the “Tire­less Tee” for a nickname. The “Tee” had been in Pearl Harbor on December 7....

  • Commandos and Their Methods
    By Commander Cyril B. Judge, U. S. Naval Reserve

    Because of the spectacular nature of their mission, a great deal of mis­information has been given out con­cerning the Commandos. Much publicity has been attached to the raids carried out from time to time on the coasts of Norway, France...

  • A Navy for China
    By Commander William C. Chambliss, U. S. Naval Reserve

    No dissenting voice was heard when the United States Government re­nounced its special rights in China, and revised our immigration laws to admit Chinese nationals on the same basis as citizens of other friendly powers. Hence­forth...

  • Naval War-Time Discipline
    By Vice Admiral J. K. Taussig, U. S. Navy

    The rapid war-time growth of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard to a personnel total exceeding three million has created a discipline problem far different from that existing in times of peace. Prior to Pearl Harbor, our personnel were all...

  • A Simplified Method for Identifying Stars
    By Lieutenant Raymond Scott, U.S.C.G.R.

    The study of the history and lore of the stars in the heavens is one of the oldest sciences known to man. The ancients as early as 2000 B.C. were as much interested in the study and use of stars as we are today. However, this article does not...

  • The Background to Japanese Naval Treachery in the Pacific
    By James K. Eyre, Jr.

    The Japanese are imitators, but always with intelligence, selection, and improvement. They borrow in order to improve.”—William Elliot Griffis, “The Evolution of the Japanese Navy,” ...

  • The Weather Man Looks at Air Transport
    By Commander Howard B. Hutchinson, U. S. Navy

    The airplane as an instrument is prov­ing to be as revolutionary in its revi­sion of established methods for waging war as was the discovery of bronze, the invention of propellants, or the building of ships with sides of iron. This...

  • Discussions, Comments and Notes

    The Watchmaker and the Scientist — An Almost Forgotten Controversy

  • Book Reviews

    Ten Years in Japan. By Joseph C. Grew. New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc. 1944. 538 pages. $3.75.

    Reviewed by Lieutenant William W. Jeffries, U. S. Naval Reserve...

  • Notes on International Affairs

    America and the War

  • Professional Notes
  • Photographs & Illustrations

 
 

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