Proceedings Magazine - May 1933 Vol. 59/5/363

Highlights

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  • The Swing Of The Pendulum
    By Lieutenant (J.G.) Frederick J. Bell, U. S. Navy
  • The Development Of Manchuria
    By Lieutenant Bern Anderson, U. S. Navy
  • Working During Working Hours
    By Captain Forde A. Todd, U. S. Navy

    Any man can only do so much work a day as a steady job. Of course, in times of emergency, he can spurt up and put forth a big increase in output. It cannot, however, be sustained. He is calling on his reserves of energy built...

  • Naval Reserve Liaison Officer
    By Lieutenant Commander Frederick R. Francke, U. S. Naval Reserve

    The naval reserve officer has in his district the opportunity of acting as liaison officer between the navy and the civilian. There exists a demand for this service for the good of all concerned. In the measure in which the reserve officer...

  • The Last Sortie Of The German Fleet
    By Lieutenant Commander D. D. Mercer, Royal Navy (Retired)

                Between April 23 and 25, 1918, there took place in the North Sea two important movements of the opposing naval forces which, if circumstances of a trivial nature had not interfered, might have resulted in...

  • Rescue Of Crew Of A Foundering Vessel
    By Captain Giles C. Stedman

                A distress signal, apprehensive call for all mariners, was dispatched into the air. The urgent message, often repeated, was sent by a despairing radio operator aboard a foundering British freight vessel,...

  • Twilight
    By Lieutenant Commander W. A. Mason, U. S. Navy

    TWILIGHT

    By LIEUTENANT COMMANDER W. A. MASON, U. S. Navy

     

  • A Plea For Ciphers
    By Fletcher Pratt

    The real or supposed advantages of codes over ciphers for military and naval communication may be summed up in three statements: (1) A code message can be sent and received in less time than a cipher message. (2) Codes are less...

  • Navigational Antecedents
    By Commander H. D. McGuire, U. S. Navy

    Who builds i’ th’ way
    Where all pass by,
    Shall make his house
    Too low or too high.—(Old Saying)

     

               ...

  • Fighting Planes
    By Lieutenant Hugh H. Goodwin, U.S. Navy

    The ideal fighting plane may be visualized as an airplane with ex­tremely high speed, maximum rate of climb, superb maneuverability, high­est possible ceiling, and offensive and de­fensive armament.

  • Discussions

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  • Notes On International Affairs

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  • Book Reviews

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  • Professional Notes

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  • Photographs

 
 

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