Proceedings Magazine - 1905 Vol. 31/4/116

Cover Story

The more important questions relating to the admittance of a belligerent's ships to the ports or territorial waters of a neutral, may be conveniently discussed under three heads: (1) Asylum; (...

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  • Belligerent Warships in Neutral Ports
    By Theodore S. Woolsey

    The more important questions relating to the admittance of a belligerent's ships to the ports or territorial waters of a neutral, may be conveniently discussed under three heads: (1) Asylum; (2) Hospitality; (3) A base of naval operations. As...

  • The Battle of the Sea of Japan
    By Captain Richard Wainwright, U. S. Navy

    Many accounts of the naval fight in the Sea of Japan have been written, and some of them by writers accustomed to treat of naval subjects. There would not be any reason for writing another account had not these accounts been written so soon after...

  • Why Togo Won
    By Commander Bradley A. Fiske, U. S. Navy

    The accounts that we read of the final naval battle between the Japanese and Russians are so meager that one may easily become confused if he tries to make out exactly what things happened, and the succession in which they happened. Most accounts...

  • Desertions in the Navy: A Contribution to the Discussion of the Question
    By Rear-Admiral Caspar F. Goodrich, U. S. Navy

    When the late Rear-Admiral Taylor was announced as the President's selection for the position of Chief of the Bureau of Navigation I wrote to him, offering to utilize the opportunities I enjoyed as captain of a receiving ship, to which...

  • Is Amalgamation a Failure? Being an Examination of the So-Called Proofs that Such is the Case, and a Defense of our Present Engineering Organization by the Commissioned Personnel of the Navy
    By Lieutenant-Commander L. H. Chandler, U. S. Navy

    Throughout the last year, especially since the Bennington disaster, the newspapers and periodicals of the country, daily, weekly, monthly, maritime and non-maritime, professional and non-professional, in fact almost every regular publication that...

  • Early American Visitors to Japan
    By Charles W. Stewart

    The early Americans who visited Japan have received scant notice from writers and historians.

  • A New Method in Nautical Astronomy
    By H.B. Goodwin

    Amongst the many new features which distinguish present-day processes of navigation from those practiced half, or even a quarter of a century since, few are more remarkable than the manner in which the observation for latitude "near the...

  • Submarines: A Description of Types, Operations of, and Accidents to Submarines
    By Lieutenant J. H. Tomb, U. S. Navy

    Submarines have received so little discussion in comparison with their value, that I am induced to write this article in order to invite criticism and discussion.

  • The Stadimeter in Fire Control
    By Commander Bradley A. Fiske, U. S. Navy

    In order to determine the instrumental accuracy of the stadimeter, I took twenty successive observations with one which had been loaned me by the Ordnance Officer at the New York Yard. The object which I observed had a height of 15 1/2 feet and...

  • Notes on the Use of the Great Circle Sailing Chart for the Solution of Problems in Nautical Astronomy
    By Lieut.-Commander Armistead Rust, U. S. Navy

    1. There are a number of problems in Nautical Astronomy which may be conveniently solved with the aid of a Great Circle Sailing Chart.

    PROBLEM I.—TO IDENTIFY AN UNKNOWN STAR HAVING GIVEN THE LATITUDE AND THE LONGITUDE OF THE OBSERVER...

  • Discussion

    THE TRUTH ABOUT NAVAL ADMINISTRATION. (See No. 114.)

    Naval Constructor T. G. ROBERTS, U. S. Navy.—Availing myself of the privilege of closing the discussion, I wish to refer to the plan of navy yard consolidation...

  • Professional Notes
    Prepared by Professor Philip R. Alger, U. S. Navy

    SHIPS OF WAR, BUDGETS, AND PERSONNEL.

    BRAZIL.

  • Book Notices

    "The China-Japan War," compiled from Japanese, Chinese and foreign sources. By Vladimir (lately of the Diplomatic Mission to Corea).

  • List of Prize Essays

    1879.

    Naval Education. Prize Essay, 1879. By Lieut.-Com. A. D. Brown, U.S.N.

    Naval Education. First Honorable Mention. By Lieut.-Com. C. F. Goodrich, U.S.N.

    Naval Education. Second Honorable...

  • Notice

    NOTICE.

  • Constitution and By-Laws

    The amended Constitution, which follows, was adopted by 437 affirmative votes out of a total vote of 442.

    CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS.


    ARTICLE I.—...

  • Special Notice

    NAVAL INSTITUTE PRIZE ESSAY, 1906.

    A prize of two hundred dollars, with a gold medal, and a life-membership in the Institute, is offered by the Naval Institute for the best essay presented on any subject pertaining to the naval profession...

  • Officers of the Institute

    President.

    Rear-Admiral CASPAR F. GOODRICH, U. S. Navy.

     

    Vice-President.

    ...

 
 

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