Proceedings Magazine - 1890 Vol. 16/4/55

Cover Story

Among the many problems arising from the use of steel in naval construction, none is more important than that of protecting the under-water body of a vessel from the corrosive action of sea-water...

Overlay

Highlights

Members Only

  • The Protection of the Hulls of Vessels by Lacquer
    By Lieutenant J. B. Murdock, U.S.N.

    Among the many problems arising from the use of steel in naval construction, none is more important than that of protecting the under-water body of a vessel from the corrosive action of sea-water. The problem is a modification of the old one of...

  • The System of Naval Training and Discipline Required to Promote Efficiency and Attract Americans
    By Lieutenant W. F. Fullam, U. S. Navy

    The abandonment of sail power in ships of war—even in cruising ships; the introduction of many complicated weapons that require great care and skill for their effective use; the probability that naval battles will be shorter in the future...

  • A Study of the Movements of the Atmosphere
    By Lieut. E. Fournier, of the French Navy (Translated by Prof. J. Leroux, U. S. Naval Academy)

    The author of the present study prefaces his essay with a few general considerations upon the advances made in meteorology, especially in the study of the mechanics of the atmosphere, which is now coming to the front. Sailors will be the first to...

  • Address of Hon. James R. Soley, Assistant Secretary of the Navy
    By Hon. James R. Soley, Assistant Secretary of the Navy

    On the Occasion of the Unveiling of the Jeannette Monument at the United States Naval Academy,

    Annapolis, Maryland, October 30, 1890.

  • Professional Notes

    TARGET PRACTICE AT THE NAVAL ACADEMY.

    By Lieutenant-Commander C. S. Sperry,

    Head of Department of

    Ordnance and Gunnery....

  • Reviews

    Submarine Mines in Relation to War. By Major G. S. Clarke, C. M. G., R. E. Woolwich: Printed at the Royal Artillery Institution, 1890.

  • Bibliographic Notes

    AMERICAN CHEMICAL JOURNAL.

    Volume XII, No. 4, April, 1890. W. M. Burton and L. D. Vorce have determined the atomic weight of magnesium, finding the number 24.287 (O = 16). H. W. Hillyer describes a convenient form of gas generator for...

  • Officers of the Institute

    OFFICERS OF THE INSTITUTE.

    1891.

    Elected at the regular annual meeting, held at Annapolis, Md., October 31, 1890.


    ...
  • Special Notice

    NAVAL INSTITUTE PRIZE ESSAY, 1891.


    A prize of one hundred dollars, with a gold medal, is offered by the Naval Institute for the best essay presented on any subject pertaining to the naval...

  • Advertisements

 
 

Conferences and Events

Maritime Security Dialogue

Wed, 2018-11-28

Maritime Security DialogueThe Return of Great Power Competition and SECOND Fleet A discussion with VADM Andrew "Woody"...

Defense Forum Washington 2018

WEST 2019

View All

From the Press

15 November - Discussion

Thu, 2018-11-15

16 November - Meet & Greet

Fri, 2018-11-16

Why Become a Member of the U.S. Naval Institute?

As an independent forum for over 140 years, the Naval Institute has been nurturing creative thinkers who responsibly raise their voices on matters relating to national defense.

Become a Member Renew Membership