TRAILBLAZER

If you are a member, log in to receive member pricing
TRAILBLAZER
The U.S. Navy's First Black Admiral
  • ISBN/SKU: 9781591143383
  • Binding: Hardcover
  • Era: 20th century
  • Number of Pages: 288
  • Subject: Autobiography
  • Date Available: October 2010
If you are a member, log in to receive member pricing
$34.95 List Price
$27.96 Member Price
Full Description:

A Proceedings Magazine 2010 Notable Naval Book

A Navy pioneer, Vice Adm. Samuel Gravely was the first African American to be commissioned a flag officer in the U.S. Navy, the first to command a Navy ship in the twentieth century, and the first to command a U.S. numbered fleet. In this memoir, co-authored by the noted naval historian Paul Stillwell, Gravely describes his life from his boyhood in Richmond, Virginia, through his officer service on board a World War II submarine chaser, to later tours of duty at sea and ashore. Denied housing and even jailed for impersonating an officer, he recounts efforts to overcome both cultural and institutional obstacles posed by racism as he rose through the ranks. In 2009, the Navy named the guided missile destroyer Gravely in his honor.

Vice Adm. Samuel L. Gravely Jr., USN (Ret.), was commissioned as an ensign in 1944, served on board U.S. Navy combatant ships in three wars, and was promoted to rear admiral in 1971. He retired in 1980 and died in 2004.

Paul Stillwell is the editor of the award-winning The Golden Thirteen: Recollections of the First Black Naval Officers. He lives in Arnold, MD.

~ Praise for Trailblazer ~

 

"Gravely’s biography, Trailblazer: The U.S. Navy’s First Black Admiral, is the heartfelt tale of how education, hard work, perseverance and luck came together for a remarkable and inspirational leader."

-- Ho'okele News (Pearl Harbor - Hickam News)

"Trailblazer, The U.S. Navy’s First Black Admiral, is a tour de force first-person account of the life of Samuel L. Gravely, Jr. In his youth, he learned well the lessons of Jim Crow in his home-town of Richmond, Virginia. In spite of the various obstacles placed in his path by a narrow-minded society, he  went on to become one of the first African Americans to be commissioned as an  officer and, ultimately, as the very first African American officer to attain  flag rank in the U.S. Navy. One certainly need not be a fan or student of the military realm to appreciate the dedication and drive of this remarkable man, who overcame, with great courage, grace, and poise, every challenge he faced as the trailblazer."

-- Conway  B. Jones, Jr. The Post Newspaper Group

Read the complete review here 

Customer Reviews
1 Review
(1)
(0)
(0)
(0)
(0)
Average Customer Reviews
5.00 Stars
Trailblazer, The U. S. Navy's First Black Admiral
Thursday, December 2, 2010
By: conwayjonesjr@aol.com

“Trailblazer, The U.S. Navy’s First Black Admiral”, is a tour de force first-person account of the life of Samuel L. Gravely, Jr. In his youth, he learned well the lessons of Jim Crow in his home-town of Richmond, Virginia. In spite of the various obstacles placed in his path by a narrow-minded society, he went on to become one of the first African Americans to be commissioned as an officer and, ultimately, as the very first African American officer to attain flag rank in the U.S. Navy. Admiral Gravely tells his story with the help of Paul Stillwell, who is a Navy veteran, editor and author of “The Golden Thirteen: Recollections of the First Black Naval Officers.” In the Trailblazer book, we see through Admiral Gravely’s eyes and in his voice how he climbed the ladder in the Navy to become the first African American to command a ship, the first to command a fleet, and the first to become an admiral in 1971. His ground-breaking achievements were a tribute to his deeply ingrained strength of character, fiercely dedicated temperament, and dogged perseverance. Trailblazer also details the personal legacy of Admiral Gravely, the husband and family man, as seen through the eyes of his devoted and loving wife, Alma, including their whirlwind courtship, which lead to their marriage in 1946 – a rich and full union that lasted 58 years – to the death of their beloved older son Robbie in 1978, and finally to Alma’s making peace with the certainty of his impending death. “Sammie,” as Alma affectionately referred to the Admiral, very wisely drew from a diverse pool of experiences, as well as from leadership examples provided by his fellow officers, in modeling his own command style during his impressive naval service career. He became THE role model to emulate and set a fine example for thousands of African American naval officers who came after him. Admiral Gravely poignantly describes one of the more distasteful aspects that made an excruciatingly painful and enduring impression on him during his first duty posting, after his graduation from midshipman school in December 1941. He had returned to Camp Robert Smalls , where he had started his naval service two years earlier, only to find that he was still living in a very clearly segregated world. The naval training station at Great Lakes had quarters for white officers, but not for him. The officer’s club was open to white officers, but not to him. To add insult to injury, after he pulled daily watches encompassing the whole camp, he had to return to the distinctly separate “Black camp” each night to sleep. Gravely, regarding this blatant disparity in the service ranks (and society as a whole) as a formidable obstacle, noted, “This was one of the hardest things for me to take of anything that happened to me during my Navy career.” Admiral Gravely always relished and welcomed any and every opportunity for additional training, personal enrichment, and overall challenge of being a part of something new. Continuous educational growth formed the bulwark of his life’s mantra. He never knew what he would encounter in the next stage of his life, but he knew for certain what he was leaving behind. He just wanted to be “a regular sailor.” Samuel L. Gravely was “a regular sailor” … and then some! As Rear Admiral Barry C. Black, USN (Ret.) said in his advanced praise of the book, “Vice Admiral Samuel L. Gravely, Jr. blazed a trail of courage, hospitality, humility, excellence, faithfulness, and patriotism. His pioneering accomplishments opened doors of opportunity for thousands, enabling me to become the Chief of Navy Chaplains and the 62nd Chaplain of the Unites States Senate. I stand on his strong shoulders.” Trailblazer is an inspiring story about an exceptionally unique barrier-breaking and visionary gentleman, Vice Admiral Samuel L. Gravely, Jr., USN. It is a very humbling regular sailor’s account of triumph and growth in the face of adversity and of his awe inspiring legacy to our Nation and our U.S. Navy. One certainly need not be a fan or student of the military realm to appreciate the dedication and drive of this remarkable man, who overcame, with great courage, grace, and poise, every challenge he faced as the Trailblazer.

 

 
 

Conferences and Events

2014 U.S. Naval Institute Annual Meeting

Wed, 2014-04-16

U.S. Naval Institute members and supporters are cordially invited to attend the 2014 U.S. Naval Institute Annual Meeting...

View All

From the Press

Award Presentation

Sat, 2014-04-26

"Wrecks, Rescues, and Mysteries: Air and Sea Disasters"

Sat, 2014-04-26

Why Become a Member of the U.S. Naval Institute?

As an independent forum for over 135 years, the Naval Institute has been nurturing creative thinkers who responsibly raise their voices on matters relating to national defense.

Become a Member Renew Membership